Monday, August 29, 2016

Building Greenbrier Maryland

The Second Battle of Greenbrier will resume as soon as Greenbrier is built, but that's going to take a couple of weekends, so watch this space.


Soldier on!

Mannie

Thursday, August 25, 2016

The Second Battle of Greenbrier: installment two

Make way for the artillery!

The Third Michigan Volunteer Infantry has been on the March for three days coming from Alexandria Virginia to points unknown to the west.  A halt is called on a Maryland road to give artillery the right of way.



It is becoming increasingly clear to the men of Grand Rapids that they're on
their way to action.



The limbers and caissons are moving with some urgency.






Before too long this wrought-iron tube will be too hot to touch.



Infantry always makes way for the guns.



Despite the dust, this is a welcome break for the footsore men from Michigan.



It's an opportunity to take a long pull from a tepid canteen.



Though a battle-hardened veteran, this sergeant always feels anxious
when artillery is on the move.



Time will tell.

Soldier on!


Mannie

Sunday, August 21, 2016

The Second Battle of Greenbrier


(The first battle of Greenbrier can be viewed here)
Something's brewing.


In the Cumberland Valley of western Maryland, just ten miles east of Boonsboro is the crossroads settlement of Greenbrier Maryland. With a sparse population of about six farming families, Greenbrier has not been unscathed by the war. 

It was while sorting the previous Autumn's potatoes that Wilmer Newcomer hears the all-too familiar of what sounded like sustained thunder coming from the west.


Looking down the road the road toward the rumbling he sees motion at the bridge that crosses the Little Greenbrier creek.



Cavalry!  Federal cavalry.


Although Newcomer is as Unionist he hates seeing cavalry, at the gallop, back in the Valley. The last time they had been here the result was the day-long battle at Sharpsburg which left him with fences downed, wheat and barley trampled to the ground, livestock run off, and a barn full of wounded Federals for nearly a month,



After his last experience of being near a battle, he decides this time to evacuate his goods, livestock, and family to nearby Rohersville.  He and his oldest boy will remain behind to safeguard the house, corncribs, and spring house.



He foresees another four months of hardship if the last time is any indicator.  His straw had to be burned (after being used as bedding by the wounded), his well was fouled, and his woodlot had to be severely thinned to make new rails when the armies left the Valley.





He had heard that Rebels had been seen again near Sharpsburg but he's become wary of the constant wartime rumors.



Despite his Union sympathies, he'll be glad to see the backs of both armies.


All he can do now is hunker down and await developments...


and so shall we.



Soldier on!
Mannie


Sunday, August 14, 2016

Visiting the toy soldier studio and some old posts



Goodness! It's been almost exactly a year since my last post. The posting and playing have really suffered at the hands of my difficult working schedule (did I mention that I commute 25 hours a week?), but today I ventured out into the heat to reacquaint myself with the
Toy Soldiers Forever! studio out in my backyard.



Despite the heat, the pansies are holding up pretty well.



The studio is for storage of odds and ends and some photography; most of the serious stuff happens in the set-up I have in my basement.  Still the little building is a very charming place to visit from time to time.




Some of the photography for this blog occurs at this counter, most notably the Fort Revenge saga - which can be revisited here.



This little industrial building started out as a BMC Meade's headquarters and was featured in this post.


One shelf contains some of my vintage McLoughin paper Franco-Prussian soldiers.


These are some of the free downloadable soldiers from Walkerloo.  You can view the assembly adventure here.

The Third Michigan project now resides in a cabinet downstairs but his hand-painted placard remains behind in the studio. The "Old Third" can be seen here.




The view out the door brings a splash of colorful zinnias.



I keep promising myself to get back into the toy soldier groove.  Maybe this Autumn.

Soldier on!
Mannie